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006 Which Type of Athlete R U?

006 Which Type of Athlete R U?

By Jurmaine Health

Elite and Professional Athlete’s Attitude vs The Rest The Mindsets and Habits of Weekend Warrior Sports Enthusiasts Fitness Hobbyists Gym Ornaments

SHERMAIN [01:23]
So the elite ones their strengths is that they are very disciplined, they are extremely disciplined, their discipline of mind, they are disciplined in their body, so in their brain in their body, they are cognizant of what their coaches are doing for them. In the cases of tennis players, they know where they finish with a particular coach and what they want to get out of it with the particular coach and they would move on to another coach and that’s quite common. Whereas if you’re talking about let’s say, for example, soccer teams in Europe, it’s not so much the players that selects the coach. It’s the company or the club that selects the coach so the players have very little

SHERMAIN [02:22]
They will start shifting coaches as well. So that in and of itself, it’s whether it’s how you get along with the coach, whether you are, you understand and you get the most out of coaching system, then they would be very responsive to that. What I see a lot in some elite levels, or amateur but then, what amateur is quite difficult to define as well, because in the Olympic Games, as long as you’re not a paid athlete, it’s counted as an amateur game as long as you are paid. Like you’re talking about the Spanish League, the English league, the NBA, NFL, they’re all professional leagues, but these are paid ones. So there’s a different kind of level of elite training. So in and of itself, how would you measure that that’s a bit different as well. So sometimes if you are talking about elite training, it also means your training, you’re able to train at least two to three times a day. And your full time job is just training

SHERMAIN [03:30]
Sport and training. And you are performing at a certain level and you’re winning most of your categories or categories or your games or races or competition, then that will be considered elite athlete might not be an elite sport, but will be an elite athlete. So that’s how I would classify them as with as compared to most people who aspires to be elite athletes, I will call them most of them are recreational, I think.

Dr Shermain Wong is a seasoned chiropractor with particular expertise in Sports Medicine and a passion for the benefits of in ‘Active Release Technique™ (an advanced Soft Tissue Technique developed by Chiropractors). She is professionally trained in ART and has a Masters in Clinical Chiropractic from RMIT University. Dr Wong has provided chiropractic and movement rehabilitation services at international sporting competitions, and provided rehabilitation and training for professional dancers, professional football players and professional athletes.

She can be found at https://www.jurmainehealth.com.au/dr-shermain-wong/

Episode 006: Which Type of Athlete R U

Podcast brought to you by Jurmaine Health

JACKIE [00:00]

This is Jurmaine Health, the center to help you achieve wellness in both your brain and body. We endeavor to encourage cross communication between health professionals for your health and well being. We bring you topics on neuro psychology, neuro behavior, neuro musculoskeletal, neuro gastro, movement is well being, metabolism and microbiome, which are also some of the services that we provide. Today we'll be talking to you about the different types of athletes that we see. By this we mean elite athletes, professional, amateur sport enthusiasts, hobby fitness, weekend warriors, and regular recreational Joe and Jane athletes. Each type varies in their body types and capabilities, their requirements, their presentations, and emotional, mental strengths and weaknesses. And today, we'll be giving you a brief introduction into this topic. I have Dr. Shermain Wong and Miss Cera Lai with me today. Say hello guys.

[00:59]

Hello

JACKIE [01:00]

So which would we like to start off with? What would we want to introduce? We had an elite athlete today, we might as well start with them then.

SHERMAIN [01:09]

Okay. According to the free dictionary, a person who is currently or has previously competed in the Olympics, or as a professional athlete is known to be an elite athlete.

JACKIE [01:21]

How they present in the clinic Shermain?

SHERMAIN [01:23]

So the elite ones their strengths is that they are very disciplined, they are extremely disciplined, their discipline of mind, they are disciplined in their body, so in their brain in their body, they are cognizant of what their coaches are doing for them. In the cases of tennis players, they know where they finish with a particular coach and what they want to get out of it with the particular coach and they would move on to another coach and that's quite common. Whereas if you're talking about let's say, for example, soccer teams in Europe, it's not so much the players that selects the coach. It's the company or the club that selects the coach so the players have very little �

JACKIE [02:02]

players will occasionally follow a coach.

SHERMAIN [02:04]

Yeah, they will, they might follow a coach. But that might be very few and far between we are talking about a soccer team or a AFL team, or maybe even in the NFL team. If you're talking about individual athletes, like golfers,

JACKIE [02:19]

boxing and stuff like that will help

SHERMAIN [02:22]

They will start shifting coaches as well. So that in and of itself, it's whether it's how you get along with the coach, whether you are, you understand and you get the most out of coaching system, then they would be very responsive to that. What I see a lot in some elite levels, or amateur but then, what amateur is quite difficult to define as well, because in the Olympic Games, as long as you're not a paid athlete, it's counted as an amateur game as long as you are paid. Like you're talking about the Spanish League, the English league, the NBA, NFL, they're all professional leagues, but these are paid ones. So there's a different kind of level of elite training. So in and of itself, how would you measure that that's a bit different as well. So sometimes if you are talking about elite training, it also means your training, you're able to train at least two to three times a day. And your full time job is just training

JACKIE [03:29]

sport

SHERMAIN [03:30]

Sport and training. And you are performing at a certain level and you're winning most of your categories or categories or your games or races or competition, then that will be considered elite athlete might not be an elite sport, but will be an elite athlete. So that's how I would classify them as with as compared to most people who aspires to be elite athletes, I will call them most of them are recreational, I think

JACKIE [04:00]

Or hobby fitness

SHERMAIN [04:01]

or hobby fitness? So recreational athletes would be the ones that training consistently, training similarly in terms of technicalities, to an elite athlete or physical development to an elite athlete, but they are not necessarily going competitive,

JACKIE [04:21]

they're not aiming for a particular goal in their actual sport or chosen activity.

SHERMAIN [04:27]

That's correct. So they're pretty much just some doing it

JACKIE [04:31]

for themselves

SHERMAIN [04:32]

for themselves. It's almost like a personal development kind of

JACKIE [04:36]

they're trying to achieve a better version of themselves.

SHERMAIN [04:38]

Yeah, just trying to achieve a better version of themselves and

JACKIE [04:41]

Set their own PBS.

SHERMAIN [04:42]

That's right. You see that a lot in crossfitters or recreational weightlifters or recreational golfers and anyone, or, badminton players or something like that? I don't know. But badminton players maybe just weekend warriors. They probably play two times a week.

CERA [04:57]

It's a social.

SHERMAIN [04:58]

Yeah, it's a social thing. It is largely social

JACKIE [05:01]

A recreational thing then as social recreational about the same.

SHERMAIN [05:06]

I think we have recreational they have a little bit more discipline with that. With weekend warriors, they do it largely to socialize. Yeah, for the social activity of that. So the demands on their bodies are quite different. And their expectations are also quite different. And then there's the what else do we have?

JACKIE [05:27]

sport enthusiasts?

SHERMAIN [05:30]

Sport enthusiasts? Yes. So sports enthusiasts what I would describe them as a mix, so they'll probably train in IronMan. And then after that, they'll probably train in footy or CrossFit or something so they sort of mix it up quite a little bit,

CERA [05:45]

like cricket and then footy

SHERMAIN [05:54]

That's right. A lot of these sport sports enthusiasts. It's great that they're interested in sport is in they have some activity, what we commonly see is that because of the differences in the way they are preparing their body for these different completely different sports, sometimes there's no transferability in their physical development.

CERA [06:14]

There's no offseason.

SHERMAIN [06:15]

Yeah, and there's no offseason too. So and a lot of times the majority of these people are tradies who do that.

[06:23]

Yeah, pretty much.

SHERMAIN [06:24]

Yeah. So when you have people who are doing physical jobs, and then they go into CrossFit, footy or cricket training, and then they that circle keeps going around and around every day, day in day out for the entire year, so the body will start breaking down, because the body is confused, like, what are you asking me to do? Really,

JACKIE [06:45]

Or you're doing repetitively, in some cases, the same sort of action, so it becomes a repetitive stress strain or repetitive stress injury as well?

SHERMAIN [06:56]

That's definitely

JACKIE [06:57]

You do see that sometimes from someone that does, like say electrical work. So a tradie again, to doing electrical work and then going to cricket where to upper body as well, especially with certain parts of it going upper body to upper body, upper body will not handle that much �

SHERMAIN [07:17]

Pressure. So those are the kind of athletes that we see. And the preparation for them is a bit different when you're talking about sports enthusiasts because unlike the elite athletes, in the elite athlete level, they have a pressure to perform. They have a responsibility to perform, they have a desire to perform and get results. So working with them takes a long time. But working with them, we find it's easier working with them because they already have that discipline to execute that through to see the program through, the plan for them through

[07:51]

They want the results.

SHERMAIN [07:52]

Yeah, they want the results and they will adhere to recommendations as per recommended pathways and they generally get a really good result with that. And then as compared to the sports enthusiasts, for some reason they

JACKIE [08:05]

It's not just a sport enthusiast because your weekend warriors won't listen either. And I think your hobby fitness won�t listen and also amateur or what they talk about amateur athletes here when like I said, we're talking before about the soccer sort of thing. Yeah. The only ones that I could probably see that would follow morally would be your recreational. Yeah, regular recreation, but the rest of them I'm probably going to lump them all into the same basket that you were just discussing.

SHERMAIN [08:32]

Yes. So I think you're right about

JACKIE [08:34]

Sport enthusiast, hobby fitness and weekend warriors no chance.

CERA [08:37]

That is the social component. Yes. You're trying to take them out of it, kind of defeats the purpose of them pursuing that activity.

SHERMAIN [08:46]

Yes, there's a social component and the social component is larger than the competitiveness of sport. That is true. What they fail to understand is that if they do not train and develop their physicality properly, they are going to not be able to socialize properly

JACKIE [09:04]

A lot of them pretty much forget this part like Shermain is saying, they automatically get Alright, but I want up but I wanna that's pretty much it. That's what we hear. And they don't seem to get it. They don't seem to understand that if they keep pretty much doing the same activity and injuring themselves further and further, it's going to be it, you're not going to be able to do it at all.

SHERMAIN [09:27]

Yes.

JACKIE [09:28]

Versus we were limiting you currently,

SHERMAIN [09:30]

Yes. All that if they don't change what they're doing. Sometimes it's just about changing And the thing is that it's a case of a the paradox of personality is like, I want to do this so much, but I don't want to prepare for this so much. So what they want versus what they really want. They're two completely different things and what they want, what they really want and versus what they need are three different things altogether. So when that happens, how do we try to satisfy all those requirements, we can't, we cannot

JACKIE [10:06]

change them. We can't

SHERMAIN [10:07]

More so, they really don't like hearing that.

JACKIE [10:09]

Sometimes they'll respond, if it's a choice between the sport or the activity they're doing and their work where you know, you can't eliminate one factor because they have no choice. They have to do their work, but they can then limit the other one or modify something in the other one, occasionally that will get through, they'll respond to that, because they'll know that if they continue as they are it will pretty much creep into their work. Again, this one tradies seem to respond a little better with these kind of approach. People that usually tend to work at a desk just seem to write it off as much as you try to explain that it's all contributing, they just go. Yeah, but and that's where it stays, and then you just hit every excuse under the book.

SHERMAIN [10:51]

A lot of their personalities are detrimental to their own injury and progress. I think that's what it is. And I see that a lot in amateur masters level athletes.

JACKIE [11:01]

Yeah,

SHERMAIN [11:02]

I see a lot of that happening. They are, especially if they are crossing over from different types of sporting or fitness activities. They almost always have a reticence of resting. So it's like their resistance training is rest. So sometimes it's almost like we're trying to prevent themselves from them further injuring themselves. And when that happens, it can be a bit tricky. We can never ever be able to fully convince someone, someone has that person has got to be able to understand what their body is responding to, and how their body responds. What do you think Cera?

CERA [11:45]

I agree, especially for the Masters category like they, especially if they have you know, taken time off between endeavours and you know, come back to competition or some level of competition and have success with it. They might train like they were 20, 10-20 years ago. And that's really hard to convince and pull back because, at different age levels not let's not say it masters. I personally felt it like turning from like 25 to 30. The way I train has to change because my body just couldn't adapt to the amount of, not injury but assault, I guess, been inflicting myself with. So being smart. And I guess it's really a big picture. Right. What is the goal?

SHERMAIN [12:32]

of you? What's your endgame? Yeah, the very least,

It really depends on the person if you're talking about goals, an elite athlete has their own goals too, recreational athlete has their own goals too. What a lot of people do not understand is that they don't understand what your own goals are. So they can't prepare properly for what they want to do, even if it's social. Even if it's recreational. They need to understand that this is my goal. I want to be wanted to be social. I really thoroughly enjoy being social. And I want to be able to do these number of things without injuring myself. How do I do that? If I'm a recreational athlete, I train four, five days a week, but I'm not going to go for some serious competition. What do I want to get out of that? What kind of satisfaction do I want to get out of it? How much time do I have got to go into the clinic? If I need rehab to get that happening? Sometimes you don't need a lot because recreational athlete knows that. I'm going to go for mini comps I'm happy with my mini comps as long as I enjoy myself and then to get me better. I don't have got to put in the kind of level of effort an elite athlete needs to put in and also some athletes when as they're transitioning between advanced and sub elite levels. That's it. I think that's the most precarious period because they seem to think that they know everything they know, above and beyond what you are qualified to do what we are qualified to do, they will challenge us and challenge us. And rightly so.

JACKIE [14:13]

Yeah.

SHERMAIN [14:14]

They're able to ask questions, they're able to get answers, you know, not happy at the answers.

JACKIE [14:17]

Yeah

SHERMAIN [14:18]

Completely. And that is completely okay. But what it is, is that they would almost always go up to you and go like, well, I don't want to do this. I don't want to do my rehab. But I want you to fix me, you know, like, well, how can we do this? Because it's your body, not mine. And healing capacities are different. Different people have different capacities. I see that in the younger athletes as well, younger athletes, they might be transitioning into an elite role. And they go, fix me immediately.

JACKIE [14:51]

You do say that? Okay, I'm giving you one go, one go only. And I'm expecting a miracle cure.

I've got a race next week.

That's pretty much it. Or, whatever next week, it's a call, I'm coming in on Saturday. I've got to compete tomorrow. Thanks, guys. Thanks.

No pressure there whatsoever. Oh, they come in that very morning going, alright, I need to play like half the game, the very least because we are playing finals.

Those are the situations that when that happens, that is a character maturity, which I don't think a lot of them have.

JACKIE [15:26]

Sometimes when they are going just for the finals, there, by this point, if it's just like that, if it's gotten to that point I'm getting it right for the final

Playing performance-based for the final. But after this, when you've got your offseason, we're rebuilding you.

SHERMAIN [15:46]

That's correct

JACKIE [15:47]

This is the only way that I allow these kind of play

SHERMAIN [15:50]

that goes into performance management

SHERMAIN [15:51]

Yeah, which we spoke about in our previous podcast. If you don't know what that is, go listen to it. It's in the previous podcast. Hope you enjoyed that too. That is different that is performance management because you already know them and they have come in you know several times before but what it is I'm talking about is that new people coming on completely new ones and they go like, you've got half an hour or whatever time you have and you got to get it fixed. And you�ve got to be right

JACKIE [16:18]

And they are the worst, these are legitimately people that have given multiple turns to everyone else but will give us one hit and get all right. I just want to do this I just want you to get me right. Give you exercise na na don't worry about exercise. I don't want to hear any of these. I just want to be right for this.

SHERMAIN [16:33]

How do they expect to be right? What goes in their mind?

JACKIE [16:36]

I sometimes get to the point of when I recognize patients like these coming in when literally when I'm walking through the room if I recognize this because I've seen something on the sheet to tell me it's pretty much give me a red flag about it. My first question or one of my first few questions is areyou going to be alright to do a few exercises as well as you're gonna be right for the next few weeks we need to organize so you can be coming in the next few weeks to get you right, versus, let's just try fix you right now. I automatically put it out there so that they know they've got to be prepared to come in and versus an immediate fix, I will say I'll do my best to get them as right as possible in the one hit, but I automatically say can't guarantee in other words, I do not want to guarantee because I need you to pretty much put effort into this to prepare yourself to help try and prepare yourself more or less so you can recover versus alright, this is enough. I can deal with this.

SHERMAIN [17:32]

Those are the different levels of professionalism, we will have what you call it

It's not even caliber it's just professionalism and attitudes to their own health, not so much ours.

SHERMAIN [17:43]

So those are the different types of athletes and they have got different. Number one, they've got different goals and they have got different attitudes. They're very well disciplined. They would push the boundaries they will almost always push the boundaries and boundaries with their own physicality. However, at the same time, they will almost always listen quite well to most health professionals, regardless of whether they're professional health professionals putting out on the right track or not. That's a different matter altogether.

And they would see through a lot of the protocols or prescription because they are athletes and that's what they will do, as compared to everyone else under the sun. They will be thinking, but I know how to do this better. I don't want to do this. I've seen YouTube.

SHERMAIN [18:37]

You are too expensive. Why should I listen to you? So that those are the differences. Are you happy with those differences?

JACKIE [18:45]

Cera. Anything? Are we missing anything?

CERA [18:47]

No. Pretty good.

Do we fall under any of these titles? Recreational�

SHERMAIN [18:53]

I used to be training about two to three times a day. So have you ever trained two or three times a day, a day.

CERA [19:00]

twice a day for sport, CrossFit.

SHERMAIN

Yeah. Okay, so that's kind of a sub, is that like intermediate to advanced level, because it's twice a day. That's a lot of training times a day.

JACKIE [19:15]

I was training up to three hours a day, yeah, three to four hours a day

JACKIE [19:23]

I was doing that. That was when I was losing all the weight.

SHERMAIN [19:26]

So I was training to prepare to represent the country.

But I did train about four hours a day minimum on top of being a full time student. This is a segway now about my life. Polytechnic yeah

SHERMAIN [19:40]

Polytechnic usually means, you know, you go to, at 17 years old, 18 years old over here Year 11 and 12. In Singapore, it's either the, it's called junior colleges, or tertiary education, which is a diploma.

Yes, it's like you're so in Europe

In Europe, the polytechnics are like the university. Some of them. If a European goes to Singapore. You know oh you come from Polytechnic you might get two very different response. So it's like going to the Melbourne Polytechnic here or something like that you get a very different response.

I did a lot of competitive Taekwondo then and that's why I trained a lot during that time. Would I call myself elite probably not, probably advanced to be elite level. I will have probably have had to go to Turkey or to Korea to train really hard, kick some trees or something like that. I don't know. The North are brutal too they used to run around in snow and bare feet and all those kind of things.

JACKIE [20:40]

If you ask any European, they did the same. They're all elite athletes.

They used to walk for miles upon miles. That's what every grandparent will tell you.

Yeah, so miles and miles to get to high school in snow

SHERMAIN [20:57]

Let's keep going. What are we up to? I think we've covered most things.

JACKIE [21:02]

We have covered body types, capabilities, their requirements, what we usually see. And we said we'll bypass the emotional, mental strengths, weaknesses. We covered a little bit of it but we skimmed it we didn't cover �

SHERMAIN [21:16]

We will cover it in more detail, that�s a separate podcast. But hopefully this gives you an idea of where you guys sit in the spectrum of athleticism, or athletic endeavors.

JACKIE [21:31]

And what we'd like to see is you guys coming in when we next time we see you, and saying which title you think you fall under,

CERA [21:39]

comment under the Instagram post or Facebook post, what category you fall under, so we can poll or at least so that we know you've been listening.

[21:48]

This is how we'll know whether you've been listening to us or not. If you like what we're presenting, please give us a thumbs up a like or share it with one other person who you think we may be a help. For those of you who are coaches, dancers or athletes, and may find difficulty with expressing or executing movement patterns. Please do connect with us on our website, www.jurmainehealth.com.au and Jurmaine Health is spelled j u r m a i n e h e a l t h. Or please socialize with us on Facebook, which is Jurmaine Health or Instagram which is Jurmaine Health body. And last but not least, since this podcast is made for you, our clients, patients and fans, please do let us know what else you might like to hear about. And that's us for today. Have a good weekend, guys. Bye. See you.

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